Thursday Doors – August 9, 2018

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

Maudie’s Door  

Born Maud Dowley in March 1903 is South Ohio, Nova Scotia, Maud Lewis was one of Canada’s best-known folk artists.

Lewis who was severely hampered by advanced arthritis from birth, spent most of her adult life living in poverty with her husband Everett. For over three decades the couple lived together in his one-room shack in rural Nova Scotia without electricity or running water.

To make money Maud sold her paintings from their roadside home to tourists and passersby for about $5.00 each, and never more than the $10.00 apiece she was asking for around the time of her death in 1970.

Since the 2017 release of the film Maudie starring Sally Hawkins as Maud and Ethan Hawke as Everett, which dramatically depicts Lewis’ life, there has been a resurgence in the popularity of her work. Thanks to the film a whole new generation of people are coming to know and love this warm, delightful spirit who painted such bright happy scenes of life in rural Nova Scotia.

We recently visited the permanent exhibit containing a large number of Lewis’ works at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (AGNS) in Halifax.

The star of the AGNS-Lewis exhibit is not any one of Maud’s framed works, but perhaps her greatest work of all, the one-room shack she and Everett lived in.

Over the 30+ years she spent in this 13 1/2 foot by 12 1/2 foot (4.1m x 3.8m ) home, Lewis painted virtually every surface with her joyful artwork.

From the walls to the breadbox,

to the stove, serving trays, and the stairs,

up to and including the windows…

…and yes, even the doors 🙂

People would often drive past and notice the odd sight of this cheerfully painted roadside shack in Marshalltown, with the “Art for Sale” sign out front, and then circle back to take a closer look.

Despite never travelling more than 90 miles (145 km) from her home in her entire life, Lewis’ work grew in popularity thanks in part to a feature article and photo-shoot published in the Toronto Star newspaper which was then followed-up by a profile piece on our national network, CBC television in 1965.

After Everett’s death in 1979 the home was abandoned and left to deteriorate. A group of concerned citizens from the area formed the Maud Lewis Painted House Society in an effort to save the landmark structure.

In 1984 the province of Nova Scotia purchased the home from the group in order to preserve it as a heritage building.

It was eventually dismantled piece by piece and moved to the AGNS where it was painstakingly restored, and then reassembled and put on display as part of the permanent exhibit.

If you’re interested, you can read more about Maud Lewis’ life here or find out more about the AGNS and this exhibit on their website.

If you get the chance to, I’d also highly recommend the movie Maudie, particularly for Hawkins’ performance, but a word of warning: make sure to keep the tissues handy.

As always, thanks for reading 🙂

Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

Don’t forget that if you share your blog posts on Twitter and Instagram, use the #ThursdayDoors hashtag to help others find you, and please do take a few minutes to visit some of the Thursday Door posts shared by others.

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Photography, Thursday Doors and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

89 Responses to Thursday Doors – August 9, 2018

  1. mistermuse says:

    Not only interesting pix, but interesting trivia: South Ohio (USA) is where I live, and now I learn there is a South Ohio in Nova Scotia. Makes me wonder how the town in Nova Scotia came to be named (perhaps founded by someone originally from the southern half of the state?).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Welcome and thanks for the visit and comment. Yes, the area seems to have been settled by Europeans in the latter half of the 18th century. I don’t know this for certain mind you, but my guess would be by loyalists fleeing the US after the war of independence.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. dennyho says:

    Husband and I watched MAUDIE last weekend after reading your post. It was spectacular! Thanks for recommending the movie Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Amy says:

    That is such a wonderful piece of history preserved. I’ve seen the previews for the movie, but haven’t watched it. This definitely piques my interest. Nova Scotia is where my maternal grandfather was born and my mother and I talk about visiting there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Amy. We found the film to be very moving. .
      My mom was born on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. Giving her the chance to go back there this summer for the first time in over 40 years was pretty special.
      I hope you do decide to visit, you won’t regret it; such beautiful scenery and the people are so friendly and welcoming.

      Like

  4. Rowena says:

    Thank you so much Norm for sharing her incredible story and all the photos. I intend to follow it up and am thinking about finding some door photos of my own to participate in your weekly challenge.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I was completely unaware of Maud’s story and am absolutely delighted that you have introduced me to it. I was not ready for the entire house to be on display and shouted out WOW when it appeared here in the post. Whimsical. Wonderous. Wowza. Thank you for entertaining me so completely today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks for the visit and the kind words Lisa. As part of the exhibit there’s a display with photos and info panels explaining how they dismantled, moved, restored, and reassembled it all: truly fascinating stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What a beautiful story, thank you for sharing it. What an amazing inspiring woman. She persevered through poverty and extreme pain. I watched the video, thanks for including this. Now, I need to watch the movie “Maudie.” I’m so glad her gorgeous little home was saved so others can enjoy. The door is incredible. =)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Welcome back Norm! What a delightful post! I love her folk art style of painting, and her life story is amazing. I’m going to look for the movie too.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Oh, what a lovely recommendation, I’ll be happy to see the film, preferably with mom who loves biopics. Her spirit and joy for life comes across easily. I also love the tulips on the gallery doors, drawn for this occasion, I presume. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Tara says:

    I enjoyed her colorful world. AND I find out there’s an Ethan Hawke movie I haven’t seen. Thanks, Norm!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. That’s so cool they restored her house. She was a terrific artist. I will definitely see the movie.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. marianallen says:

    What delightful art! She must have been a very happy soul, to create such a bright environment for herself. We have several Grandma Moses prints, the closest American equivalent to “Maudie”.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Sherry Felix says:

    Fascinating post Norm. I’m reading about how Europes decimated bird life. Nice to see a ray of sunshine.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. prior.. says:

    oh and welcome back !

    Liked by 1 person

  14. prior.. says:

    what an inspiring artist Maude was.
    and my fav picture of this post is the one of the door and the man standing looking at the art to the back right.
    You give us a sense of the setting and scale – but also even more of the vibe as they commemorate this wonderful painter.
    beautiful share, thanks Norm

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Welcome back, Norm! Thank you for introducing me to Maude. Her spirit and joy of life shine through all of her work. I love that she decorated every square inch of her home… she had no barriers to her creativity. I am going to look for Maudie on Netflix (or wherever). Thanks for the warning about the tissues.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. What a wonderful post. Maud’s creativity just spills out. Have put this on my list of places to see. Thanks, Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. joey says:

    I’m going to leave the work of a fellow blogger here — this is a poem about doors, inspired by our group. If you like, you can link him to the frog.
    https://pluviolover.wordpress.com/2018/08/06/poetry-doors/

    Liked by 2 people

  18. joey says:

    I can’t thank you enough for sharing this new-to-me artist and her delightful vision. I love the colors and spirit of her work. It’s resplendent with cheer and appreciation for the natural world. I’m positively delighted someone saw to saving these pieces of hers and very pleased in the resurgence of her work.
    This was an excellent choice for your return. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Hi Norm, Welcome back! Lovely post. I made a boo-boo and need you to remove my first attempt at linking to Thursday Doors via the “frog.” Something went wrong. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thank you. I deleted the faulty link but just so you know, if it ever happens again I do allow in the settings for everyone to be able to delete they’re own link if there’s a problem with it.

      Like

  20. Debbie Smyth says:

    Fascinating – what an amazing woman

    Liked by 1 person

  21. tgeriatrix says:

    What a wonderful lady!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Junieper says:

    Welcome back in blogland, Norm. Hope you had the things in your vacation you wanted! Wow, love this story -every detail of her life is that one of an passionate artist! How rich or poor one is, does not count in the end. She lived well and to the fullest. You gave a beautiful and clear account of that. I wished I had known her while she was alive!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. JT Twissel says:

    Delightful! I saw the movie a while back – she sure had a hard life but at least found some joy in painting.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. julieallyn says:

    Not sure if I got mine added correctly via your link so including here as an extra measure. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      It worked fine. By the way, you can always click on your own link after you post to double check it if you’re not sure. And I did allow in the settings for everyone to be able to delete they’re own link if there’s a problem with it.

      Like

  25. dennyho says:

    I am awed by how two people can live for thirty years in such close proximity and remain married. Most importantly, I am inspired by her adaptability…I do not know her story (yet, plan to watch movie asap) but she appears to have embraced her talents and put forth nothing but beauty instead of resentment or anger. Welcome back Norm, terrific post!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. scooj says:

    What a lovely post – I shall be sure to look out for the film. Welcome back.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. marianbeaman says:

    Enlightening post! Maud’s art is unique, quirky.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. slfinnell says:

    How Heartwarming! Wonderful return post 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Michel Croft says:

    Hi Norman Nice pictures. Love that you got to see the house from the movie.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Ally Bean says:

    What a fascinating shack that is! I’ve not heard of Maude but I can see that she liked color and used what she had at hand to make her life better. Interesting door, for sure.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Welcome back, Norm. I hope you’re refreshed and renewed from the break. What a sad story about the abject poverty, but what a joyous statement her paintings in the “house” make! I’m happy about the move and preservation, too. Thanks for sharing this. It seems lots of artists, even those known worldwide often struggled during their lifetimes.

    janet

    Liked by 2 people

  32. Nice to have you back. You brought a wonderfully different setting for a door!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Jackie says:

    Well, you certainly got me here. I was unaware of Maudie, the artist or movie, I am ashamed to say. But I will be on a mission to find out more.
    The house as an exhibit, is absolutely fantastic and makes me want to go to Halifax just to see it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      I was only vaguely familiar with her work before seeing the movie a few months ago. After that I knew that we had to take some time to check out this exhibit since we were going to be in the Halifax area on vacation.

      Like

  34. Pistachios says:

    People say that a bit of paint can go a long way in brightening up a place, and in this case it went a really long way! It’s heart-warming to see what she did with so little.
    P.S. hope you had a good break!

    Liked by 1 person

  35. willowdot21 says:

    This is a wonderful example to us all of how art and beauty can flourish inadversity. This is a really interesting post 💜.💜

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Well, Norm, you certainly know how to make an entrance. This is an amazing story. The art is wonderful, and the fact that two people lived in a ‘tiny’ house way back when is also very interesting. I’m going to look for the movie. This is a true lesson in humility but too bad she couldn’t have enjoyed knowing her art was so valued and appreciated. You hit it out of the ballpark with this one. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      I’d call this taking ‘tiny house’ to the extreme 😉
      If you do end up watching the movie, please circle back let me know what you think of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I just spent my Sunday evening with Maud. It was one of the most uplifting, humbling, heart wrenching movies I’ve ever watched. The casting and the acting was absolutely wonderful. I thank you for showing us her doors and letting us know about this truly artistic wonder. I will tell everyone I know that they really should watch it. I was able to record it off one of the premium channels, but my local library also had a copy. One word – inspirational. Thank you, Norm. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  37. Dan Antion says:

    Welcome back, Norm. It’s good to see your post in my inbox!

    What an amazing story. The little you were able to share makes me sad and happy. I am glad the house was preserved, so that her amazing work isn’t lost. That front door is so fun looking, it’s hard to imagine that they were living in poverty.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thank you Dan. It was a delight to see this place in-person knowing it was now protected from the elements. You should have seen the display with photos and info panels explaining how they dismantled, moved, restored, and reassembled it all. Fascinating stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. dweezer19 says:

    How marvelous. The art itself shows her joy of life and creating. Thanks for sharing her story, Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Joanne Sisco says:

    I’ve started to watch the movie Maudie twice and have yet to finish it. This is truly the remarkable life of a positive spirit that couldn’t be suppressed. I love everything about this story 💕

    Liked by 1 person

  40. travtrails says:

    Fantastic…creativity has no limits

    Liked by 1 person

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