Thursday Doors – May 24, 2018

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below.

Caserne No. 30 – Fire Station 30 – Mile-End Neighbourhood, Montréal

As a contrast to last week’s rural post from the countryside east of Québec City, this week I thought I’d take you into the heart of one of my favourite neighbourhoods in Montréal: Mile-End.

Sitting on the northwestern corner of St-Laurent Blvd and Ave. Laurier W. in the Plateau Mont-Royal borough, Fire Station #30 has been one of the most noticeable structures in Montréal’s Mile-End neighbourhood for a little over a century.

Station 30 was designed in 1898 by architect and city engineer Joseph-Émile Vanier. Meant to be the new municipal building and City Hall for the then burgeoning town of St-Louis-du-Mile-End, construction began in 1904 and the building was completed in December of 1905.

The Chateau-style building originally consisted of a city council room, a fire station, a police station, municipal court, dormitory, stables, and an attic; talk about multi-tasking! It would serve these functions for barely five years, when the town of Saint-Louis was annexed by the city of Montréal in 1910.

Major renovations were done to the building in the early 1950’s and today this old municipal building is home to the city’s Fire Station 30.

I have to say that the little kid in me found that watching big shiny bright red fire trucks going in or coming out of those lovely arched doors was a sight to behold 😁

Since 1980, part of the building also houses Montréal’s Auxiliary Firefighter’s Museum – Musée des pompiers auxiliaires de Montréal.

The museum is only open on Sundays and unfortunately I have not had a chance to visit it yet. Based on the info on their website the museum provides an interesting peek into the history of the Montréal fire service and contains an extensive collection of old photographs and fire-fighting equipment.

If I do make it back when it’s open I will be sure to do a follow-up post, but for now let’s finish my usual once-around the building to see what we can find.

An interesting ghost door for starters.

A street-art mural in honour of one of Mile-Ends favourite sons, novelist Mordecai Richler.

Here are some of the side doors.

A turret and tower.

And of course, the main door money shots

As always, thanks so much for dropping by 🙂

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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71 Responses to Thursday Doors – May 24, 2018

  1. Amy says:

    This building is wonderful all around. I love how the green roof and yellow doors flow so nicely with the color of the stonework. Thanks for sharing this beauty!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a pretty home for a fireman brigade! I hope you never see the ones in Slovenia. All the doors are great and I really love the ghost door.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. reocochran says:

    This is a super deluxe Chateau inspired fire station, Norm!
    This has such elegant and beautiful features and details! Thank you for sharing several sides and close ups.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wow, that is the prettiest fire station I’ve ever seen, great find Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. joey says:

    That is a stunning, magnificent building! Castle much?!? I had to show all that to my family. We are all “OOH!” I just love the old alarm and the letter box on the yellow doors 🙂 Great doors! Really outdid yourself here!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I guess they don’t have to go far to rescue the damsel in the tower. lol very cool fire station and nice doors.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Beautiful building! I love the idea of a fire station in a chateau style building. And the yellow doors go very well with it. The pop of red here and there is also very appealing.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Su Leslie says:

    Beautiful building. So much nicer than NZ’s utilitarian (but probably very user-friendly) fire stations. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Now, that’s a Firehouse!! 🙂 Love those yellow arched doors.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. John Holton says:

    That’s one hell of a fire station…

    Liked by 1 person

  11. jesh stg says:

    All the finishing touches around the doors make it fini! And love that the color of the stone make the yellow of the doors warm and inviting (which it would be harsh or cheap combined with other colors). Thanks for making the trip for this post:)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Love, love, love it. What a majestic building. The red bench, fire hydrant, and firebox really pop against the stone building – fitting for a firehouse.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Wonderful Gothic Pompiers!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Fabulous building! I love that it is still being used as a firehouse. And, I love the term “ghost door.” I have a few of those in my collection… and now they have a name!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. LucciaGray says:

    Fabulous building and doors, Norm. My grandson wants to be a firefighter. He’s only 5, but I’m sure he’d love to go inside!
    I have some temporary, fancy plywood doors today. They’re not my favourite, but they’re the ones they use, just for a week at the May Fair.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Tara says:

    Love, love, love, love, love!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. marianallen says:

    What a fabulous building? You gotta wonder who decided a chateau style was the most appropriate architecture for a fire department. Impressive, yes, but seems more suited to pouring boiling oil onto besiegers than putting out fires. Thanks for the walk-around pictures. The details are everything.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Marian. I think this was a time when the prevailing thought about public buildings was about making a grand statement and not so much about function or cost.
      It’s certainly the fanciest firehouse I’ve ever seen.

      Like

  18. I wonder what happened if, on the way to a hearing at the municipal court, you lost your way and arrived at the stables instead!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. conspicari says:

    Great looking building, some fine doors there too.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. That is certainly a very interesting building. We live in the neighbourood so we walk by it very often and I am always amazed by it. Nice pics. (Suzanne)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Suzanne. That is a fun part of town to call home. I hope you guys take advantage of the fresh bagels. Do you have a favourite between Fairmount & St. V? Personally I can’t taste a difference – they’re both delicious. Especially if they’re still warm 😀

      Like

      • It is indeed (we live in Outremont). We do buy bagels very often and I also can’t tell the difference between the two bagel places…though I think the Fairmount one is maybe a tad sweeter. They are only good when they are warm. Bagels don’t age well.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Sherry Felix says:

    A fairy castle. Charming.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Suzanne says:

    Fantastic way to re-purpose a charming old building.That second set of yellow doors is absolute perfection. Love how you framed the final photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Leah says:

    This must certainly be the most beautiful and sophisticated fire hall in the world! Just gorgeous.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Ally Bean says:

    What a cool building. Those large arched doors are amazing. But the turret… oh my! That kind of architectural style is long gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Pistachios says:

    When you listed all the building’s original functions, I actually scrolled back up to the photo to try to figure out how all of that could’ve fitted in one building. And stables too? I do like that ghost door. I wonder which department it used to lead to…
    It’s always a “pause and watch” moment when fire trucks drive out of their stations 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      There seems to be 3 floors to the place, plus I’m sure the municipal offices and courthouse wouldn’t need to be that big for what was a relatively small town.
      Yes fire trucks do have a way of fascinating young and old alike 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Jackie says:

    Talk about fancy!!
    I’m going “fancy” this week too but in a more monetary nature.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Joanne Sisco says:

    Oh yes1 This is a building that has it all … a turret, arched doorways, and those interesting bits and baubles decorating the arches to make them even more stunning. I spent an hour driving around the suburban wasteland north of Toronto yesterday, so I appreciate this architectural work of art even more.
    As an unrelated aside … have you ever noticed you really like some words just because they feel nice to say? Pompier is one of those words for me 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Joanne. There are a few gorgeous churches I want to check into in this neighbourhood as well – true architectural treasures. If you’re looking for a hip trendy part of Montreal to explore, this would be it.
      We’ll check your pronunciation on “Pompier” next time we see you 😉

      Like

  28. Dan Antion says:

    Wow! It doesn’t get much better than that, Norm. Stone, history, big arched doors and fire trucks – I could spend the day watching the activity. It’s such a magnificent building, I’m glad it’s able to serve the city in some regard. I can’t imagine all that planning and work only to be annexed within five years. I hope you make it back to the museum at some point.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. P1XL8 says:

    Beautiful building !

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Susi Lovell says:

    Finally I get to know the story behind this gorgeous building! Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      The more I stop to pay attention to some of these grand old places the more I discover. There’s a wonderful big old church diagonally across the park from this firehouse that I have to go back and check out as well.

      Like

  31. Ruth says:

    I think the little red ‘break glass open door’ is my favourite 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Norm, this is one of the most beautiful buildings I’ve ever seen. It’s breathtaking, and the fact that it still serves as a fire station is wonderful. Thank you for sharing because I can guarantee you no one will see a fire station that remotely resembles that architecture here in the states. Love the mural too. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Judy. I’ve admired this building for decades and can’t believe it took me this long to actually stop and investigate further. I do intend to get back to their museum one of these days.

      Liked by 1 person

  33. scooj says:

    I love buildings like this of this period. Nice mural too.

    Liked by 1 person

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