Thursday Doors – February 22, 2018

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

Église Saint-Louis-de-France – Vieux Terrebonne

The Parish of Saint-Louis-de-France was initially established in 1723 in what is now Vieux Terrebonne. This puts it among the 35 oldest Parishes in New France.

The original church was built in 1743 much closer to the Mille-Iles river about 600 yards down the hill from the current church’s location.

By the mid 1860’s the congregation had outgrown the original building and plans were drawn up to build a much bigger church nearby.

At the time Terrebonne was a relatively poor rural farming community. It took close to a dozen years to raise the funds for construction of the new church.

A generous donation of land by a wealthy local benefactor also helped get the project moving forward.

Designed by French Canadian architect Louis-Gustave Martin, the current structure was built between 1877 and 1879, and aside from a number of renovations and upgrades made over the years, it remains intact today.

On a snowy afternoon a few weekends ago I took a walk around to explore its doors and see what else there was to discover about this beautiful structure.

As always, thanks so much for dropping by 🙂

Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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62 Responses to Thursday Doors – February 22, 2018

  1. reocochran says:

    I realize the actual photos are of the “newer” version but seem to echo our 1700’s churches in New England, Norm. Beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. reocochran says:

    The history and the need to take a dozen years for this humble parish were double features I enjoyed reading about the French church, 1700’s and late 1800’s styles are not too different in appearance in this case. Smiles, Robin 🌠

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Amy says:

    That’s a beautiful building Norm! And I love how much the snow sets it all off. I think we’ve seen all of the snow that we will see here for this year. Last week we set records for warm days! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. joey says:

    Oof! The beauty of that snow, Norm. I mean, the doors are wonderful and the building is all the superlatives, but the snow really adds that layer of Ooh! for me. We’ve had a lot of rain lately and it seems so odd, because ordinarily that would have been five days of snow, here in February.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Joey. We’ll see how it goes but I believe we may already be done with the snow here. We’ve had a lot of rain the last few days too and unseasonably warm temps causing snow melt. there are serious concerns about flooding in some areas too.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Pistachios says:

    No wonder it took so long to raise funds for it – that church is nothing short of grand!
    I’m loving the falling snow in the photos. Almost feels like I’m right there with you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Amazing images and with blurred snow flakes for the authentic touch!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. beautiful church doors.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Jennie says:

    Yes, it is a beautiful structure!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. It’s absolutely gorgeous! In the snow magical! I loved the person in red in the first image. It really lent a sense of scale to the building. It’s HUGE! I hope it draws a packed house for Mass.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Beautiful pictures! At first I thought you added a nice sepia filter on your images, then I realized that that’s what winter and snow looks like. Who knew? (Well, I guess a lot of people knew). Just lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. dweezer19 says:

    It has a cold melancholy about it. But so beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. You sure took many photos in that snow. I guess that’s what you do when there is no choice. Well done!

    Liked by 2 people

  13. slfinnell says:

    Lord! It occurs to me lately what a wimp I am when it comes to hiking in the cold for doors. The confines of a heated vehicle are addictive. Especially with my creaky bones. lol My utmost respect to you Mr. Norm!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      I don’t deserve that much credit. It only seems impressive. I usually don’t go out unless it’s relatively mild. This day for example was only a few degrees below freezing. Very bearable if you dress for it.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. jesh stg says:

    Beautiful captures Norm. Like how the snow softens this old church. That the town came together to raise funds for the door, is a statement they valued this building. Makes me appreciate the doors even more! Thanks for taking time to visit it.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. JT Twissel says:

    Beautiful pictures – are you using a tinted lens?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Jan. No tinted lens. Perhaps what you’re seeing is the slight underexposure on these shots. Bright snowy scenes play havoc with a camera’s metering sensor. The camera usually sees a very bright scene and overcompensates by making it a bit too dark. I guess I didn’t brighten these up enough in processing.

      Like

  16. Candy says:

    I always marvel at the craftsmanship in old churches.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Vicky says:

    I knew so little about Canada before I joined this weekly challenge. What a wealth of architecture you have! This a beautiful church, wonderful doors and I’m trying to imagine how a poor farming community raised the funds. They must have had so much devotion to the church. Does religion play such a part in people’s lives now in Canada? Lovely post, thanks for taking us there, I’m glad it was you in the snow though!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      The Catholic church played a major role in French Canada until the 1960’s. I don’t think it was by accident that people began rejecting the church right around the time that the birth control pill became readily available 😉
      English Canada’s Protestant roots were always a little more low-key compared to the Catholics.
      Today both cultures are very much secular and not very devout at all. Most pay lip-service to the main traditions but are not actively practicing.
      The most devout people here now are newcomers, usually of non-Christian religions such as Islam, Sikhism, Orthodox Jews, Hindu. Their overt practices are very different from what most secular Christians are used to, and just like elsewhere, it can lead to some friction in society.

      Like

  18. Fabulous building, Norm. I like the way the fourth shot from the top shows how large those windows are, compared to the door. Nice big arched windows, the interior must be flooded with light.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Wanda says:

    What a beautiful church and I love those doors. I feel my offering this week pales in comparison.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Jackie says:

    A beauty.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. LucciaGray says:

    Stunning building. It doesn’t look so ancient. It must have been modern when it was built.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks for the kind words Luccia.
      Well it’s only 140 years old so not ancient by any means. Plus it has a mix of various styles which makes it look more modern than say something done in the Gothic style.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. marianallen says:

    Big doors, little doors, all so different and all so alike. A beautiful building, with every detail coordinated with love.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. There is a flavour of Eastern Orthodox about those towers with their elaborate crosses. The new build looks more utilitarian, a bit like modern churches in France. Great pictures as usual.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Looks beautiful but cold. 🙂 The snow really adds to the atmosphere in your photos, but the church is handsome enough to stand on its own.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Ally Bean says:

    Beautiful photos. The snow + wooden doors make for a building that looks inviting.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Handsome church built by true craftsmen. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Joanne Sisco says:

    A building with a trio of cupola-like structures on top! Wonderful!!
    The fact that it came with note-worthy doors is just a bonus 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Dan Antion says:

    These are beautiful doors, Norm. I love the way the side doors mirror the main door, even in the arched transom window. All those panels! Just looking at them is making me tired, but such wonderful craftsmanship.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. scooj says:

    Some really beautiful and grand doors on the church…and of course the snow!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Sherry Felix says:

    Love the church, especially with the snow.

    Liked by 1 person

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