Thursday Doors – July 6, 2017

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

La Chapelle des Cuthbert – Cuthbert’s Chapel, Berthierville Québec

Built in 1786 by James Cuthbert who was the only English seigneur on the shores of the St. Lawrence River in the region just east of Montréal.

Though not much to look at, this was actually the first Protestant Church in the entire province of Québec aka New France.

For those wondering what a ‘seigneur’ is, they were the wealthy landowners at the top of the food chain, in a system of royal land granting and ownership based on similar feudal systems found throughout Europe at the time. The Seigneurial system was finally abolished here in 1854.

Originally named the Chapel of Saint-Andre, the building was acquired by the provincial government in 1927 and designated as a historic monument in 1958.

I love the little iron window shutter holders – such a nice touch.

As you can see it is a pretty humble and basic structure. In fact the only thing that differentiates this old fieldstone building from the traditional homes built in that era is the steeple.

Located in Berthierville, just off of Route #138 aka Le Chemin du Roy (The King’s Road) today the building houses the local tourist info/visitor welcome center.

As always, thanks so much for visiting 🙂

Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

Don’t forget that if you share your blog posts on Twitter and Instagram, use the #ThursdayDoors hashtag to help others find you, and please do take a few minutes to visit some of the Thursday Door posts shared by others.

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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68 Responses to Thursday Doors – July 6, 2017

  1. reocochran says:

    My favorite part was how it was so cozily settled among pretty trees and then, you captured the shadows and lighting!
    This was a stunning photograph, Norm. 1786 is such a long time ago but it appears to be preserved in all its beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It exudes a simple charm and looks so serene and beautiful in its setting. I’m glad they were able to maintain this piece of history.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a lovely little place.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What a lovely Chapel. I love the red accents.
    Donna

    Liked by 2 people

  5. It’s beautiful, Norm, and in amazing condition for it’s age.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Cute little church. I like the shutter holders too.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Not much to look at! Au contraire! It’s charming! I love the arched windows, and shutters, the color of the stone & the trim, hardware, and that steeple.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Jennie says:

    Reminds me of rural Pennsylvania. Beautiful stone. Lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. JT Twissel says:

    That first picture looks like a painting – might not be that grand but it’s a pleasing sight for the eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Jan. You’re not the only one to mention that first shot. It’s growing on me. I might just print an enlargement of that one to frame and hang somewhere in the house.

      Like

  10. The beauty of simplify… I love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Gillian says:

    Everything Judy said is quite right! Simply charming and quite lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. jazzytower says:

    Nice and sturdy looking..must be quiet and cool on the inside. A place for quiet reflection:) A nice one Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Helen Bushe says:

    Your posts never fail to delight all Doorophiles.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. marianallen says:

    Ooo! The white walls! The stucco! The stones sticking out at the corners and around the doors and windows! The oxblood woodwork! I love this building SO MUCH, can you tell? lol

    Liked by 1 person

  15. jesh stg says:

    A simple, but very pretty church! Am glad the feudal system is abolished – it was short of slavery.
    My goodness, I knew you were in Lucca, but on Manja’s blog you commented that you were there in 2013 – the same year we were there in June.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Yeah Jesh, the feudal system here was helped along by the Catholic Church, but it really was about keeping the working class in their place with very little hope of upward mobility.
      We were in Tuscany in September of 2013 so there’s no chance we crossed paths without knowing it 🙂

      Like

  16. Almost Iowa says:

    So simple, so beautiful, so unlike so many modern churches.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. John says:

    It’s a very attractive structure! ❤️👍🏻

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Corina says:

    Simple things are often the most beautiful. This building is an example of that!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. This is really beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Not much to look at? I think it’s quite charming! Those are the kinds of churches in which I actually feel closest to the divine.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Jackie says:

    Another beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. slfinnell says:

    Beatiful setting for this week’s Doors kick off! Couldn’t help thinking of Chesler Cuthbert(KC Royal ballplayer) who I’m sure is no relation coming from Nicaragua lol

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Debbie Smyth says:

    Lovely chapel – someone keeps it in great condition!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Susi Lovell says:

    At first I thought the top photo was a painting. A lovely building. I didn’t even know there was an English seigneur!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Susi. I wasn’t familiar with any myself. It does make sense though that there were English fellows who knew how to play both sides well enough to benefit from whichever system was in place.

      Like

  25. joey says:

    Oh that is just charming! I love the fieldstone. I’m glad you said what it was, because I was looking at the texture wondering what that might be. I’m a big fan of fieldstone as of now. Not much of that round here. Hella limestone though. Those shutters are adorable, with their hoojawhatsit hardware. (Bet you know what those are called, too.) I love the first photo, Norm. Storybook pretty. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Joey. They have some sorta stucco/mortar covering the stone walls to even out the surface from the different sized stones but the fieldstones are only visible on the corners. It makes for a unique look.
      Your Indiana limestone was popular for a time around here too. A number of our grander structures were built using it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • joey says:

        That’s really helpful, thank you. So now I’m wondering what makes fieldstone what it is — cut with corners, as opposed to cobblestone? Maybe I should Google a bit.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Norm 2.0 says:

          I just checked the wiki page, it explains it well. You see lots of old fieldstone homes in New England and eastern Canada. The striking thing about this type of construction is how incredibly solid it is.

          Liked by 1 person

  26. Dan Antion says:

    That’s a beautiful little chapel, Norm. I’m glad it’s being well maintained. I like the colors and the little set of stairs to the side door. I love oh the sign mimics the shutters. It doesn’t appear that my pingback made it. Of course, that means it will show up as soon as I post this comment.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. That’s a little beauty, Norm! The doors and shutters make it very attractive.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Joanne Sisco says:

    It looks beautifully kept, but it’s too bad there’s no bell in the spire. I think the best part is that it’s used as a visitor welcome centre now! That feels appropriate 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  29. dweezer19 says:

    So quaint but so lovely. One thing I am noticing about these old churches. They all have red or red toned doors.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks, you’re right. Red doors do come up a lot in older churches. I’ll leave it to someone who knows more about it to speculate as to why that is.

      Like

  30. Sherry Felix says:

    Lovely old building. Very interesting to read the link about the Seigneurial system and how it shaped Canada. The ending of It postdates the French Revolution considerably. I don’t mean to imply any similarities.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Beautiful stonework, windows, shutters, hardware, and doors. Handsome little building, and it is nice that it is still being used today. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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