Thursday Doors – June 15, 2017

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

The One-Room Chapels of Ile D’Orleans, Québec

A little more than 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) east of downtown Québec City,

where the St. Lawrence River widens at Montmorency Falls as it starts to open into the gulf of St. Lawrence, you’ll find the bridge that takes you to historic Ile D’Orleans.

With its unique micro-climate tempered by the river, the island has been farmed continuously for hundreds of years. In fact upon his first visit to the island in 1535, French explorer Jacques Cartier named the island Bacchus Isle, for the Roman god of wine, because of the many grapes he found growing there.

Often referred to as the cradle of French North America, the first colonists from the Normandy and Poitou regions of France began settling on Ile D’Orleans as far back as the 1650’s. In fact, quite a few of today’s French Canadian families can trace their roots back to early settlers who made the island their first home in the new world.

The island is almost 34 kilometers (21 miles) from tip to tip, and around 8 kilometers (5 miles) at its widest point, leaving lots of room for big well spaced farms.

Today you’ll find not only wineries, but strawberry and potato farms, apple orchards, and maple syrup producers, as well as a few local cheese-makers and even a few chocolateries 😛

The main road that circles the island, Chemin Royal (the Royal Road) was first completed in 1744. Back then this road was an essential lifeline for island inhabitants. Today it’s a popular way for day-trip drivers, and cyclo-tourists to take in all of the beauty the island has to offer.

Because people were so spread out, many were too far removed from the island’s few towns and villages. Even for the most devout Catholics, attending church on a regular basis was near impossible when the closest parish was many kilometers away.

To accommodate these people a series of strategically spaced one-room chapels were built on donated lands along the island’s Chemin Royal.

These chapels were rarely staffed but at least the faithful had a place to go to pray, or to offer thanks for a bountiful harvest or a good fishing season, and for weary travelers to stop for a moment along their journeys.

Of the nine Chapelles Reposoirs that were left at the end of the 19th century, six are still standing.  On my recent doorscursion to the island, I was able to find four of them.

Frankly since they’re all supposed to be along the main road I really don’t know how I missed the fifth and sixth ones, but at least it gives me another excuse to go back 😉

As always, thanks so much for visiting 🙂

Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

Don’t forget that if you share your blog posts on Twitter and Instagram, use the #ThursdayDoors hashtag to help others find you, and please do take a few minutes to visit some of the Thursday Door posts shared by others.

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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62 Responses to Thursday Doors – June 15, 2017

  1. Seems like a happy island with happy doors. I’m glad you’re going back for more.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m glad you posted this; never saw these small one room chapels before and they are very picturisque and interesting to explain the community’s history. All of the doors on them were great collections and I hope you find the missing 2.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks so much. I had no idea they existed until I stumbled across that first while exploring the island. I do hope to get back this summer to find the last two 🙂

      Like

  3. Those are cute little churches. I like the color of the last one.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. dennyho says:

    Please tell me you tried the doors…were they locked? Or are the grumpy and weary still able to enter for a moment of solitude? What lovely photos Norm, and now you must be itching to get back to find #’s 5 and 6! Keep us posted…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Vanessa says:

    These buildings and photos are lovely! My favourite is the arched door with the stained glass. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. How charming are these?! And so romantic!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. tinahomeblog says:

    Beautiful ! I especially love the first one with the red shutters. Lara

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I’ve never seen anything like those little chapels before. Made it easier to find somewhere to pray (if you needed a place) than traipsing for miles and miles. Great that they are still in good condition.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Those chapels look so adorable! It looks like a wonderful little island to visit. Always great to have a reason to go back 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Helen Bushe says:

    These one room chapels are beautiful. Like dolls’ houses.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. slfinnell says:

    Love this story of the island churches! And that they are still cared for. Warms the heart!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m sorry we didn’t get the chance to visit Ile D’Orleans when we were in Old Québec last year. We did see it across the Saint Lawrence from Montmorency Falls and thought it would have been fun to continue our bike ride over there. Alas, we didn’t have time, but now we have a good excuse to return. Lovely little chapels and lovely doors.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      It’s too bad you didn’t get the chance to visit the Island, I’m sure you would have loved it. But as you say it leaves you with a good excuse to return 🙂

      Like

  13. joey says:

    They’re adorable. I do believe the first is my fave. Little red door, little red flowers. Lovely stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. marianallen says:

    Oh, the ADORABLE tiny churches! Thank you so much for finding and photographing them and sharing them here!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Wonderful and interesting find Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I’ve noted fewer than a handful of small roadside chapels during my travels and always assumed it was something built as a bit of whimsy. Now I know differently. Thanks, Norm!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Pistachios says:

    These little chapels are adorable! They look pretty well-maintained, considering their age

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Dymoon says:

    Thank you Norm, loved this one.. =^_^=

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Jackie says:

    Oh my! These are stunning! You should share these at inSPIREd Sunday http://inspiredsundaymeme.blogspot.ca/

    Liked by 2 people

  20. I love the little chapels. It must be so nice to drive along and see these little places where one can stop and say a prayer.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Susi Lovell says:

    These little churches are beautiful. It’s time for a trip to go and see them. Are they left open for people to go inside? I’m finding big churches are often locked these days. It would be nice to think people could pop in any time. There’s a farm on the island that produces the most yummy blackcurrant jam. I always try to pick up a couple of jars at the Montreal Christmas markets.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Oh Susi, If you like quiet country roads, rural scenery, and sweeping views of the river, then Ile D’Orleans is a must-see. I was there mid-week and the Chapels I saw were all locked. I don’t know if that changes on weekends or during peak tourist season.
      They are very cute all the same 🙂

      Like

  22. Joanne Sisco says:

    Ile D’Orleans is one of my favourite spots to visit in Quebec – partly for the food and partly for the bridge. I do love bridges … although I remember one trip when we decided to take the ferry instead.
    One of my favourite visits was when we did a food tour with friends around the island stopping at various places to sample the meats, cheeses, pies, and beer. Ahhh – good times 🙂

    I don’t remember the little churches though. They are so cute … how negligent of me to miss them! I certainly wouldn’t have known the history behind them. I love the fact that in spite of their pint size, they all have a bell 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      It is a wonderful place to visit isn’t it? A food tour sounds right up my alley, and maybe a little bicycle too, and perhaps some wine but not at the same time as the bicycle 😉
      Good catch on the bells – until you mentioned I had not noticed that they all have one.

      Like

  23. Vicky says:

    What a beautiful island and I love the concept of the little chapels. I do hope you return to find the missed ones, the ones you found are lovely, with wonderful doors. Thanks for sharing your visit, it looked like a glorious day too!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. ianbcross says:

    There is a problem with the link Norm. Ian

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Please go back. These little churches are truly beautiful, and I can imagine locals finding comfort visiting them to express concern or thankfulness regarding their harvest. Each one is truly handsome, colorful and just plain lovely. This island must certainly call out to locals and tourists. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Judy. If you ever make it up to Quebec City, this is a side trip well worth making.
      We’ve been wanting to do a bicycle tour of the island for quite some time now. Maybe this summer 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Dan Antion says:

    I love these little chapels. They are beautiful, and the doors are such a prominent feature (as doors should be). I think I like the one with the blue doors the best, although those red nd white ones are hard to beat. I’ve only ever seen a one-room chapel in rural Washington.

    I know the crops are for sale, but I couldn’t help think of a menu with wine, apple pie, cheese, chocolate, strawberries and maybe a side of fries.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. jesh stg says:

    Know virtually nothing about the French colonists. Am glad they took care of these chapel monuments for later generations to enjoy. They all look quaint, and because of their size, almost “cute.” Were most of them Catholic?

    Liked by 1 person

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