Thursday Doors – April 27, 2017

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

Notre-Dame Basilica, Old Montréal

Across the square from the Bank of Montreal Head Office Building that we looked at last week, you’ll find the the city’s most famous and quite possibly most beautiful catholic church, the Notre-Dame Basilica.

Note: In case you’re wondering these pics were taken back in mid-March when there was still snow on the ground.

If you are a well-to-do or famous Catholic French Canadian living in the Montreal area, chances are that at least one of your important life events, baptism, wedding, or funeral, will be celebrated in this glorious building.

The first Notre-Dame chapel in the French settlement known as Ville-Marie (later renamed Montréal) was built on this site in 1657. It was later expanded as a much larger Baroque style church between 1672 and 1693.

By 1800 it was becoming clear that the congregation had outgrown the existing building and it was gradually decided that a new much larger church needed to be built.

In 1824 an Anglican Irish-American architect named James O’Donnell was commissioned to design the new building. O’Donnell’s design was inline with the Gothic Revival style that was popular at the time.

The bulk of the exterior construction took place between 1824 and 1829 using locally quarried stone.

The sanctuary was completed in 1830, the first tower in 1841 and the second in 1843.

Sadly O’Donnell did not live to see his work fully completed. He died in Montréal in 1830. Just prior to his death though, he had converted to Catholicism, perhaps due to the realization that he might not be allowed to be buried in his church which was his greatest work.

To date he is the only person buried in the church’s crypt.

With a total capacity of about 2,700 sinners 😉  Notre-Dame was the largest church of any faith in all of North America for about 50 years after its completion.

The interior, which I’m saving for another post later this year, mainly because I haven’t gotten the quality shots I want yet, was completed between 1872 and 1879. The majestic Casavant Frères pipe organ was installed in 1891.

Here’s the door to the much smaller chapel built onto the rear of the building to accommodate smaller services.

Okay, I dug up one old shot from my archives of the interior to tease you with – but I am going to get much better shots the next time I go – I promise!

As always, thanks so such for visiting 🙂

Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

Don’t forget that if you share your blog posts on Twitter and Instagram, use the #ThursdayDoors hashtag to help others find you, and please do take a few minutes to visit some of the Thursday Door posts shared by others.

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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75 Responses to Thursday Doors – April 27, 2017

  1. That is one impressive church! The architecture and the doors are beautiful. The interior looks gorgeous as well. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. reocochran says:

    I liked the most elaborately carved design that I think the artist-architect, James O’Donnell is credited on your post. I like the way the stained glass looks like four leaf clovers or blossoms. Beautiful door post in so many ways, Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautiful and majestic. They stand the test of time. Thank you for sharing. ☺

    Liked by 1 person

  4. BeckyB says:

    The doors are lovely but that roof has just blown me away . . . . . stunning.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s exquisite! I cherish the stone, windows, and beautiful entryways with the curves, window transom, and iron stylistic layout. The inside picture is dazzling as well..

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pistachios says:

    Another superb selection of doors!
    When I saw that last shot (of the interior) my first thought was of the Disney castle in all its splendour haha. I’ll be waiting for that post of the interior

    Liked by 1 person

  7. The huge wooden entry doors with awesome hardware was impressive. Seems like a huge mausoleum for the architect! And I like your archive photo of the interior.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Candy says:

    Love that door to the small chapel – the whole building is magnificent. Can’t wait to see more of the interior.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m not catholic. It seems that all catholic churches are beautiful outside and inside. Beautiful doors too.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Claudia says:

    My Sunday Evening Art Gallery post about doors (http://wp.me/s5LGaO-doors) pales in comparison to your wonderful weekly magic! I have been fascinated by doors for like ever! (How pedestrian a comment, eh?) I finally wandered around and found enough for one blog — but you show me there are enough for many MANY blogs! It’s a pleasure to have found you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks for the kinds words and welcome Claudia!
      We meet here every week Thursday through Saturday so do feel free to join in whenever you have any shareworthy doors 🙂

      Like

  11. ianbcross says:

    Fine ecclesiastic doors. Interesting contrast with my post from York Minister.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Beautiful church and doors, Norm. I probably visited it when I was in Montreal, but this was so long ago (1985 or so) that I can’t remember… 😟

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Norm,
    Gorgeous church, doors, and interior. The blue colors in the ceiling are stunning.
    Donna

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I am so grateful that I was able to see that magnificent basilica in person! I’m glad you included a shot of the interior – those colors are amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s gorgeous! I love the stone, windows, and lovely doors with the arches, window transom, and iron decor. The interior image is gorgeous too. I’m looking forward to seeing more of the interior.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Andrea R Huelsenbeck says:

    This church is on my bucket list because of the beautiful colors surrounding the altar.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      I hope you get to see it. If you get a chance to visit, you won’t regret it. I always marvel at how many people let out an audible gasp when they first walk in to the place.

      Like

  17. LucciaGray says:

    Hi Norm! I love these church doors 🙂 I have villa gates, but I’ll be posting church doors soon, too!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. julieallyn says:

    Love this: With a total capacity of about 2,700 sinners…  

    BIG grin 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  19. jesh stg says:

    Wow, the inside of this church is much more luxurious than the outside! And not to forget the last door -such a complicated design! Lovely post, Norm:)

    Liked by 1 person

  20. JT Twissel says:

    Quite a fancy interior! I’m afraid I was baptized in a boring old Congregational Church!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Cee Neuner says:

    Hi Norm,
    You will see from my entrance I’m just a small town gal who lives close to the country.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. klara says:

    wonderful building. main doors are so pretty. love the reflection on the chapel door. and interior is so nice.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. J Walters says:

    I love Notre-Dame, and try to spend a bit of time there whenever I get to Montreal. You’re right. It’s glorious.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Colline says:

    A stunning piece of architecture.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Vanessa says:

    I like that you always give us a bit of history. Stunning building – would love to see it in person someday!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. marianallen says:

    What a glorious building! Picture #3 has to be my favorite door, but that interior shot is like a view of a fantasy world! The colors and shadows and highlights — just marvelous!

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Such a beautiful building, who could blame the architect for changing ‘sides’ in order to be buried in it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Norm 2.0 says:

      Thanks Jean. I just wish I could’ve found out more about the selection process for choosing the architect. In those days, especially around, here folks kinda stuck to their own kind when it came to religion in their business dealings.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Tara says:

    I’m not a church-going person, but that is one pretty structure. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. joey says:

    How grand! They are all beautiful doors on an amazing building, but the last set, on the smaller chapel, really does it for me. I think it’s the reflection.
    That’s very interesting about O’Donnell. I’m glad he gets to be with his work forever.
    I look forward to your interior shots 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Wow, that is an impressive church!

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Jackie says:

    Been there many times growing up in Montreal!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Oh my! 😮 This last one is quite good enough for me, Norm! And most excellent doors too!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Nice set of captures. Such a pretty church. Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

  34. The entire building is magnificent and that first set of doors and hardware particularly beautiful. No matter the size of the church, it’s filled (hopefully filled) with sinners, although I must admit there are many, many times more in this church than in our small one. 🙂

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  35. What wonderful doors — and everything else. Nicely done, Norm. You’ve set the bar high for this week’s door posts.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Joanne Sisco says:

    An impressive work of art!! From a distance, the doors didn’t look particularly unusual (large wooden doors, great hardware), but close-up I like the bevelled panes, intricate pattern to the hardware, and the little sections of stained glass in the transom window.

    I found it curious that this contract was assigned to an Anglican. I thought this was a time when there was great animosity between the Catholics and Anglicans. He definitely pulled out all the stops, didn’t he?!

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Dan Antion says:

    What a marvelous building, Norm. Great photos. I love those doors, especially the one with the arched transom of paneled windows and the similar one with wood panels. I like how (at least) the lower panel is actually curved. In a lot of situations like that, they fake the curve by adjusting the molding detail, but that lower panel is curved.

    Thanks for the peek inside, it looks glorious. Thanks, as always for hosting this series.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Wonderful doors, hardware, lights, and windows on a truly beautiful piece of architecture that has thrilled generations of visiting residents and visitors.

    Liked by 1 person

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