Thursday Doors – December 1, 2016

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button below. 

More Churches of Québec’s Eastern Townships – Église Saint-Patrice – Magog

Earlier this year we spent a few days exploring the Eastern Townships of southern Québec which is situated east of Montréal and south of the Saint Laurence River all the way down to the U.S. border.

Over the years the region became home to a diverse mix of settlers from the original French and then British colonies, and then later joined by Irish and Scottish immigrants, as well as American loyalists.

These influences are seen throughout the region not only in the names of the towns, such as Sherbrooke, Stanstead, Lennoxville or Granby, Bromont, and Val-Saint-Francois, but also in the eclectic mix of architectural styles found there.

Nowhere is this mix of styles more obvious than in the region’s churches.

A few weeks ago I posted some pics of l’Église du Sacré-Coeur in Stanstead. Today we look at L’Église Saint-Patrice (Saint Patrick’s) catholic church in the town of Magog. Originally built in 1886-87 and repaired and expanded after the collapse of the original bell tower during a winter storm in 1894, it is the largest catholic church in the town of 25,000.

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Want to join in on the fun and share your own Thursday Doors post with other door lovers? Click on the blue button below to add the link to your Thursday Doors post to our link-up list.

Don’t forget that if you share your blog posts on Twitter and Instagram, use the #ThursdayDoors hashtag to help others find you, and please do take a few minutes to visit some of the Thursday Door posts shared by others.

As always I thank you for looking 🙂

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About Norm 2.0

World’s youngest grumpy old man & heart failure wonder boy. Interests: writing, woodworking, photography, travel, tennis, wine, and I know a bit about power tools.
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41 Responses to Thursday Doors – December 1, 2016

  1. reocochran says:

    The beautiful stonework “sets the stage” for the elaborate and lacy white woodwork details, Norm! I liked the way you showed so many kinds of doors and angles. I liked the final door was so sweet like a doll house door. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful collection of doors and the churches that they are attached to! Since you do so well with churches you might have to start a new blog, “Sunday Churches”!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Those white church doors are divine. No pun intended… The carvings are just beautiful! A real treat, Norm.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The stonework and doors (and windows and steeples) are breathtaking! And, I always appreciate when the doors aren’t junked up with signs.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jesh stg says:

    The first door is my favorite with its intricate design. A very pretty church and I have a preference for white doors. Here in the woods though it would be a bear to take care of a white door:) As always a great choice Norm..

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Rupali says:

    Beautiful doors!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I love the doors of this church especially the door with the square windows.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. joey says:

    Wow, that’s a pretty place. Kinda perfect, if you ask me. Stone, stone, stone, and details, details, details! Small town, big church, how provincial 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I just love the stone on that building, it’s beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. jan says:

    I wouldn’t want the job of keeping those intricately carved doors white but they are beautiful!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Candy says:

    I haven’t seen this “gingerbread” type of decorative work on a church before. It is stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. dennyho says:

    These are great churches Norm, the third door being my favorite. Happy Thursday!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. jazzytower says:

    Nice work! When I see stone, I think age.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. It’s beautiful! I love the white trim with the stone. The details in the windows, and the doors are excellent.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. klara says:

    such a pretty church with so many interesting architectural details.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Everything about these two churches are simply beautiful, Norm.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I would love to sit down and talk to the craftsmen who created these beautiful doors, windows, and surrounds. I’m not sure what the correct adjective is to describe the beauty of this building and its doors, but thank you for sharing this lovely Church. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Dan Antion says:

    Let’s see…doors, stone churches and beautiful skies – I think you hit the trifecta, Norm. I love that last church. The stone work is remarkable. I can’t help but think of the craftsmen how built those beautiful walls. Such wonderful work. The top photo certainly draws your thoughts toward heaven. Great job!

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Joanne Sisco says:

    The style of these doors – with their columns between the narrow panes of glass and the little scalloped edges along the windows – is quite different from *typical* churches. Very striking.

    My very first trip unsupervised was when I was 16 and I went to Magog with a friend to spend the post-Christmas holidays at her grandparents. I don’t remember any details of the town except the over impression of a beautiful place with grand old homes magnificently decked out for Christmas. I’ve always wanted to return and never have. Thanks for the glimpse back.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Beautiful building, doors, and angles.

    Liked by 1 person

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